Dry well near the Njord field in the Norwegian Sea

Source: press release, 12 December 2018

The semi-submersible drilling rig ‘Deepsea Bergen’ is a self-propelled semi-submersible unit of enhanced Aker H-3.2 design
The semi-submersible drilling rig ‘Deepsea Bergen’ is a self-propelled semi-submersible unit of enhanced Aker H-3.2 design (photo: Odfjell Drilling Ltd.)

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) reports that Equinor Energy AS, operator of production licence 751, is in the process of concluding the drilling of wildcat well 6407/11-1. The well is dry.

The well has been drilled about 15 kilometres southeast of the Njord field and 120 kilometres north of Kristiansund, Norway.

The primary exploration target for the well was to prove petroleum in reservoir rocks in the Tofte formation, and the secondary exploration target was to prove petroleum in reservoir rocks in the Tilje formation, both from the Early Jurassic Age.

In the primary exploration target, the well encountered the Tofte formation of about 115 metres, of which effective reservoir rocks of 75 metres with sandstone of good to very good reservoir quality. The reservoir is aquiferous with traces of oil.

The Tilje formation of about 215 metres was encountered in the secondary exploration target, with effective reservoir rocks of 155 metres of sandstone, mainly of good to very good reservoir quality. The well is classified as dry.

Extensive volumes of data and samples have been collected.

This is the first exploration well in production licence 751. The licence was awarded in APA 2013.

Well 6407/11-1 was drilled to a vertical depth of 2152 metres below the sea surface and was terminated in the Åre formation from the Early Jurassic Age. Water depth is 314 metres. The well will be permanently plugged and abandoned.

Well 6407/11-1 was drilled by the Deepsea Bergen drilling rig, which will now drill wildcat well 35/11-22 S in production licence 248 C in the North Sea, where Equinor Energy AS is the operator.