The new Kasawari gas extraction platform will increase Malaysia’s gas production by 900 million cubic feet per day

Source: press release, 1 August 2022

Sarens used a set of eight CS5000 hydraulic jacks to facilitate loading the CPP to its final location
Sarens used a set of eight CS5000 hydraulic jacks to facilitate loading the CPP to its final location (photo: Sarens)

Malaysia Marine and Heavy Engineering, responsible for the construction of the platform processing module (v) for this project, turned to Sarens to lift the fabricated structure, weighing approximately 21,000 tons, using a set of eight CS5000 hydraulic jacks to facilitate its loading to its final location.

Designed by Sarens, the CS5000 is one of the most advanced jacking units on the market and the most compact which significantly reduces the lifting time, enabling significant cost savings for construction companies.

The new Kasawari gas extraction and processing platform, that will be commissioned in 2023, will allow Malaysia to take an important step forward and become a reference in Asia in terms of gas production, by increasing its output by more than 900 million cubic feet per day. This plant, which will be operated by Petronas, will be located off the coast of Sarawak in waters up to 108 metres deep, where it will be able to extract up to approximately 3 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas resources.

The construction of the platform processing module (CPP) has been carried out in Johor by Malaysia Marine and Heavy Engineering, which decided to call on Sarens’ international ultra-heavy lift experience for the CPP’s lifting work to facilitate its loading to its deploy location. Sarens provided a set of eight CS5000 jacking units, each capable of lifting up to 5,000 tons, plus 96 axle-lines SPMTs and 64 mix capacity load cells for this work. The weight of the CPP led Sarens to add a new customised support platform to safely lift the entire module.

The CS5000 is one of the most advanced jacking units on the market. Designed by Sarens for lifting and installation of extremely heavy loads, such as bridges or entire buildings, these units stand out for their ability to be controlled by a single central computer and the possibility of interconnecting different units with each other for a completely modular application and custom-engineered performance. The use of this type of jacking system is very useful when working with large structures such as the new CPP built in Johor, especially due to its compact size – approximately 2/3rd of the size of similar commercial solutions – so the installation can therefore be carried out in a shorter period of time with significant cost savings for construction companies, which find in systems such as the CS5000 a complete integrated solution for their needs.

The lifting operation started with the shipment of the eight CS5000s to Johor, coming from countries such as Belgium, Egypt, Vietnam, Indonesia or Malaysia. Once at destination and in a first phase, double 24 axles were used to shift two parts of the LSF and, in a second phase, four sets of 24 axle-lines were used to slit in under the CPP topside module.

According to Ridzuan Jamiran, Sarens Assistant Project Manager, “the most challenging part of the project was the installation and positioning off the jacks. We’re extremely proud of this amazing job where we used eight sets of the CS5000 jacking system and a combination of SPMTs to jack the 21,000-ton topside module. We are thankful to all the stakeholders involved with the project for successfully and safely completing the project.”

Sarens has extensive international experience in offering complete engineering solutions. Over the past few years, it has developed its own jacking/climbing systems for the lifting, transport and installation of bridges and buildings. It debuted its CS1000 system on the Schierstein bridge lift in Germany and used the same CS5000 model to lift several cranes in the Port Said military zone in Egypt, where it was responsible for adding up to 11.5 metres of extension legs to six STS cranes.